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Rescuing Typographic Treasures - July 2023

Thursday, July 13, 2023 7 pm Pacific Time

Watch the recording of this presentation HERE


Mark Barbour, longtime Curator of the International Printing Museum, will detail his adventures in acquiring two national typographic treasure lodes. The Smithsonian Type Collection represents 2,500 metal fonts from the Morgan Collection, 5,000 ATF fonts of ATF brass matrices and 10,000 Linotype fonts. The Dave Peat Typographic Collection in Indianapolis contains nearly 4,000 Victorian fonts, 750 wood type fonts, 350 rare type specimen books and thousands of cuts and engravings.



Smithsonian metal type proof

Mark will take us on a visual tour of both of these national treasures and the arduous process of moving nearly 40 tons of printing history to their new home at the International Printing Museum in Carson, California (about 20 minutes south of Los Angeles).


Dave Peat type shop


International Printing Museum in Carson, California


Mark Barbour helped found the International Printing Museum in 1988 focused on preserving the heritage of Gutenberg and the printed word. His vision and passion over the years have been instrumental in developing a broad base of programs and support, helping the museum to grow beyond a warehouse collection of dusty, printing industry relics into a relevant cultural and educational destination for audiences of all ages and backgrounds. The Printing Museum features one of the largest collections of working antique printing presses and equipment in the world, with a full calendar of educational programs, workshops, exhibits and an annual Los Angeles Printers Fair every October.


Mark has also been regularly engaged as a consultant for film and television on the subject of printing. The printing presses that have appeared in many films and shows often have been rented from the Printing Museum’s collections, ensuring an accurate depiction of how the equipment would have been used during the time period depicted.


American Type Founders type matrices from Smithsonian Collection












Type specimen booklet from Dave Peat Collection

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